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Democratic Watchman June 9 1871, page 8

"Some excitement was occasioned in town on Saturday last by a personal rencontra between Mr. John Harris, of this place, and Mr. W. H. H. Brainerd, editor of the Tyrone Herald, arising out of an article published by Mr. Brainerd, some time ago, in relation to the late divorce suit of Harris vs. Harris. The particulars of the affair are about as follows: Brainerd was sitting on the steps of the Brockerhoff House with Mr. Win Kinsloe, who was paying him some money, and was in the act of making change when Harris came up behind him and grasped him by the shoulder, saying, "Are you Brainerd?" or something to that effect. Brainerd, not knowing who it was that was speaking, turned his face half over his shoulder to see, at the same time replying "yes, sir." With the words, came a heavy blow from Harris upon the eye, cutting the skin and bruising the face badly. Brainerd then jumped to his feet, when, we believe, Harris hit him again, about the head, and on attempting to return the compliment, the editor skinned his knuckles against the wall of the house. They then clinched and tussled a moment, when Brainerd tore himself loose and beat a retreat, Harris pitching stone after him. Brainerd then reported at Wilson's law office and had his head bandaged, and afterwards at the Bush House, where be had his eye dressed.

Altogether, it was hardly a creditable affair to either of the parties engaged. Harris should have given the editor fair warning that he was going to hit him, and Brainerd should have spunked it out. However, a man hit unawares and sitting down, is already half conquered, and may be excused for not having his wits about him. Our advice to both the combatants is to do the thing more neatly another time.

Mr. Harris gave bail on Monday for his appearance to answer the charge of assault and battery, with intent to kill."

Democratic Watchman June 9 1871, page 8

"We believe there is a law to prevent hogs from running loose in the streets.  Some of our citizens are complaining that it is not enforced, and that there is considerable injury to gardens and yards in consequence.  The constable should see to this."

Democratic Watchman June 9 1871, page 8

"Mr. Henry Brockerhoff, of this place, has sold a fine lot on Bishop Street to the Catholic congregation for a cemetery, and a low figure, and also subscribed $500.00 toward paying for it himself.  This is exceedingly liberal in Mr. Brockerhoff, and will be properly appreciated by his Catholic friends and neighbors."

Democratic Watchman June 16 1871, page 8

"Messrs. D. G. Bush, W. F. Reynolds, and E. Blanchard, through their agent William P. Mitchell, Esq., have recently sold, the timber on their mountain tracts, known as the Parson lands, to Mr. H. Merryman of Williamsport, Pa., for $25,000."

Democratic Watchman June 16 1871, page 8

"Why does our street commissioner not see to having the streets, all the streets, cleaned up; they present an awful spectacle just now.  Some of the drains are full of slime and dirty water, which is to do for some time and causes the a to be contaminated with foul orders sufficient to produce some epidemic."

Democratic Watchman June 16 1871, page 8

"As will be seen by the following resolution, adopted by the Bellefonte and Snowshoe Railroad Company at a special meeting of the directors, held at this place on the 8th instant, that company is re and willing to begin incomplete to construction of the branch from this place to intersect the L. C. and S. C. road in the neighborhood of Oak Hall, whenever the completion of the other road is made certain.  This is certainly welcome news, and we do hope that the Lewisburg, Centre land caps Spruce Creek Company will push ahead their work at once:

Resolved, That we are ready to carry out, in good faith, the arrangements made by the respective committees of the L. C. & S. C. R. R. Co. and the B. & S. S. R. R. Co., in relation to building a line from Bellefonte to the northwest end of the Nittany mountain, in time to connect with the L. C. & S. C. R. R., whenever we are fully satisfied that the road from Lewisburg to that place shall be completed."

Democratic Watchman June 16 1871, page 8

BELLEFONTE AND ITS MANUFACTORIES

"Among the more prominent manufacturing establishments of Bellefonte and vicinity, may be named the following:

Bellefonte Glass Works

This establishment which is now under the management of J. V. Thomas, is one of them is complete establishments in the United States.  It is now being run to its full capacity which is about one hundred and fifty half boxes of window glass per day.  Progress made satisfactory is out a very superior quality, being on us to equal to the best French plate glass.  The sand, the lime, and the coal, used in its manufacture are obtained close at hand and are of the very best quality, and the supply is inexhaustible.  Although this factory has been in operation but a few years for very superior quality of the glass commands a better price in any in the market, and the demand is already so great that the company intend erecting another ten pot furnace.

Lime Kilns

Close by the Glass Works are located the Sunny Side Lime Kilns, run by J. R. and C. T. Alexander, the Bellefonte Lime Kilns owned by Messrs. Shortridge & Co.  At these two establishments quite a number of hands are employed in the quarrying of stone and burning of lime.  They had inexhaustible quantities of the purest lime stone in the world - a chemical analysis of which shows it to be ninety-seven and a half per cent carbonate of lime.  He is a beautiful snow white lime and is extensively used in the manufacture of glass in Pittsburg and for building purposes in the western in northern part of the state, and also in the state of New York.  The present capacity of the two establishments above named is about nine hundred bushels per day, and although the business is comparatively new to this locality the superior quality of the lime has created a demand far beyond the capacity of the kilns in the parties intended the wrecking additional kilns upon an extensive scale.

The Iron Interests

The iron interests of Bellefonte and vicinity although not as extensive as those of Johnstown and Danville, turn out a large quantity of the very best charcoal iron that is made in the state.  Among those engaged in the business may be named Valentine & Co., nor the owners of and run a charcoal furnace, the capacity of which is about sixty tons pig metal per week.  Also Linn & McCoy's charcoal furnace of about the same capacity; also Howard Iron Works about the same capacity, and the Eagle Iron works same capacity.  Connected with all the above furnaces, and forges, are rolling mills, in which the pig metal is converted into blooms, bar iron and wire of the finest quality.  The bulk of the bar iron is shipped to the New England states, where it is used in manufacture of cutlery, fine wire, best boiler iron, and imitation Russia sheet iron.  As a fine quality of the iron it is unequaled in the United States and unsurpassed by any in the world.

In addition to be Iron Works above named and as worthy of favorable mention is a new Rolling Mill in the suburbs of Bellefonte, owns and run by Valentines, which is one of the most complete in all its appointments they can be found in the state.  In its taken make most any thing, from railroad iron to the finest wire.

The engine in nearly of the machinery of this establishment was made at the extensive foundry and machine shops of Wm. P. Duncan, near the railroad depot in the town.  Wm. Duncan is a practical machienist and turns out from his elegant shops a very large amount of work.  He makes a specialty of Steam engines, Portable and Stationery, Saw Mills, grist mill gearing, turbine water wheels &c.

The above-mentioned establishments together with a large planning mill and extensive grist mills make up the material interests of the town - which is situate in the heart of one of the largest and best agricultural districts in the state.

Close by, and within the County, is the Snow Shoe bituminous coal field which is reached by a railroad, distant about twenty-five miles from Bellefonte.  The coal mined in the Snow Shoe region is an excellent quality and for all purposes for which bituminous coal is used it can not be equaled."

Democratic Watchman June 23 1871, page 8

"Nothing done yet to repair the Spring Creek bridge.  When someone gets his neck programs in the borough is mulcted for four or five thousand dollars damage, our borough dads will perhaps see the importance of doing something."

Democratic Watchman June 23 1871, page 8

"The "Sellers Zouaves" of Buffalo Run, contends visiting Tyrone, Altoona and Holidaysburg, on the fourth of July.  They will turn out in full uniform, and we feel confident that neither of the above towns can muster a company of better looking man."

Democratic Watchman June 30 1871, page 8

"To-day and job for repairing the wood work on outside of Court House and touching up outside walls, is to be let to the lowest bidder."

Democratic Watchman June 30 1871, page 8

"Our friends, Abe Baum, is now sold proprietor of Baum's liquor store and keeps some of the best brands in the market.  Abe is a good fell and drives one of the fastest anf handsomest spans in the county."

Democratic Watchman June 30 1871, page 8

Still Down

"That piers of the Spring Creek bridge.  If our borough dads could happen to be on it one of these days when the bridge goes down, it might frighten them into tearing out or repairing this first-class man-trap."

Democratic Watchman June 30 1871, page 8

"The Brockerhoff House, under the superintendence of Mr. George Welsh, is still have been for the proprietors, Messrs. Houseal and Krom, not withstanding an impression that has got abroad to the contrary.  Mr. Welsh is keeping a good house and sets an excellent table.  He has one of the best cooks in the country, polite and attentive waiters, and everything neat and clean.  There are about 15 or 20 sleeping rooms, well furnished, with gentleman's and ladies parlors, in the house generally is kept in good style.  Mr. Welsh is an accommodating landlord and tries his best to make his guests comfortable.  He tells us that he soon expects to resume the running of the bus between the Brockerhoff in the depot."

Democratic Watchman July 14 1871, page 8

"We believe we have thus far omitted to mention that Messrs. Downey and Yeager have removed their restaurant from Bishop Street to McClain's building, opposite the Bush House, where they are now located in the room recently occupied by Linn & Fortney as a vegetable market.  They have fitted this room up in good style and all are at all times ready to accommodate to dry and hungry public."

Democratic Watchman July 14 1871, page 8

"An old ware house, belonging to Mr. Edward Humes, situated on the canal, north of Lamb Street, was destroyed by fire on the night of the 4th instant.  Happily, there were a few articles of value in it, and those were all got out.  The heat of the burning building was wonderfully intense, caused, no doubt, by its extreme dryness in the fact that it was all plank and boards.  Burning fragments were carried through the air to various parts of town, and, had it not fortunately rained, other conflagrations might have been kindled."

Democratic Watchman July 14 1871, page 8

"We noticed that Mr. Williams McAfferty has opened a little shop in the building on the depot side of the railroad, close to the race.  William here sells lemons, oranges, candies, nuts, &c., as cheap as the cheapest.  As Mr. McAfferty is badly crippled and bound to do something of this kind for a living, we hope he may receive a profitable share of the public patronage."

Democratic Watchman July 14 1871, page 8

"We should once more remind the Town Counsel that the piers under Spring Creek bridge are in a very bad condition and liable to tumble down any moment.  Does the Counsel intended to haven fixed before the cold weather sets in?  If so they had better the about it.  It is criminal to allow them to remain in their present condition."

Democratic Watchman July 21 1871, page 8

"The movements to establish the Glass Works in this place, has, we guess, gone under."

Democratic Watchman July 21 1871, page 8

"The Logan Hose Company will hold a pic-nic in the Second Woods on the road to Milesburg, on the 4th of August."

Democratic Watchman July 21 1871, page 8

"Some churches in town ring their bells an unconscionable long time for service.  Today suppose that people are deaf?"

Democratic Watchman July 21 1871, page 8

"A substantial frame building, intended, we believe, for a school room, has been put up on the lot between the residences of Mr. Abram Sussman and Mrs. Petriken."

Democratic Watchman July 21 1871, page 8

"A change will be made in the proprietorship of the Bush House on the 1st of August.  That hotel will then pass into the control of Messrs. Clements & Lowrie, experienced hotelists, who will no doubt keep a good house."

Democratic Watchman July 21 1871, page 8

"A sort of a beginning has been made toward rebuilding the piers under Spring Creek bridge, by placing props under it.  We hope this very necessary work will be speedily put under contract, as the bridge unions present conditions is really dangerous."

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